March 8, 2014

jessehimself:

thatgirlwiththebread:

Comments on the trailer of the new Annie movie staring Quvenzhané Wallis and Jamie Foxx.

Would you just look at how racism isn’t a thing anymore in today’s society.

—-

weakness is spreading

March 8, 2014

thebestsoylatteyoueverhadandme:

shfifty-five-en-half:

The cast of The Princess Bride 25 years later. Entertainment Weekly

Brb, crying

(via beccasteph)

March 8, 2014

(Source: doctorsherlockwinlecter, via femininepositivity)

January 26, 2014

In lurve with Amanda Palmer’s prowess on internet platforms. Her tumblr is on point.

January 24, 2014

shootthewizard:

Following Rainbow Rowell on twitter has been one of my better decisions

(via rainbowrowell)

January 21, 2014

pastelmorgue:

sneakyfeets:

rapunzelie:

oops I went on a rant

last one is truth

BEAUTIFUL

(via beccasteph)

January 20, 2014
What Molly Did Next

onyellowpaper:

How stripping off to play Helen of Troy on the London stage changed the way I feel about my body

image

It’s October. It’s dusk. It’s the second week of rehearsals for The Trojan Women, a modern version of Euripides’ tragedy in which I’m greedily playing three different roles: Cassandra, the…

January 20, 2014
"Let’s examine a traditionally male-dominated role that is very well-respected, and well-paid, in many parts of the world — that of a doctor. In the UK, it is listed as one of the top ten lucrative careers, and the average annual income of a family doctor in the US is well into six figures. It also confers on you significant social status, and a common stereotype in Asian communities is of parents encouraging their children to become doctors.

One of my lecturers at university once presented us with this thought exercise: why are doctors so highly paid, and so well-respected? Our answers were predictable. Because they save lives, their skills are extremely important, and it takes years and years of education to become one. All sound, logical reasons. But these traits that doctors possess are universal. So why is it, she asked, that doctors in Russia are so lowly paid? Making less than £7,500 a year, it is one of the lowest paid professions in Russia, and poorly respected at that. Why is this?

The answer is crushingly, breathtakingly simple. In Russia, the majority of doctors are women. Here’s a quote from Carol Schmidt, a geriatric nurse practitioner who toured medical facilities in Moscow: “Their status and pay are more like our blue-collar workers, even though they require about the same amount of training as the American doctor… medical practice is stereotyped as a caring vocation ‘naturally suited‘ to women, [which puts it at] a second-class level in the Soviet psyche.”

What this illustrates perfectly is this — women are not devalued in the job market because women’s work is seen to have little value. It is the other way round. Women’s work is devalued in the job market because women are seen to have little value."

Patriarchy’s Magic Trick: How Anything Perceived As Women’s Work Immediately Sheds Its Value | Crates and Ribbons (via brutereason)

(via rainbowrowell)

January 20, 2014

jenngeek:

bigbangsheldon:

scavengervortex:

awkward question for mayim 

Flop interview

"Yeah, I’m a neuroscientist…you may not have known that."

FOR THE RECORD, THOUGH: The question he asked was actually: “Being on The Big Bang Theory, how many people —not that you’re NOT a genius— think that you can solve calculus at the drop of a hat?”

The male interviewer DID KNOW she was a scientist, though he didn’t know what kind. The female interviewer didn’t, however.

Man, I hope she and Natalie Portman have dinner occasionally where they catch up on the latest news in neurobiology and bitch about the dumb questions they’ve been asked that week. And they should do it in Hebrew or something for kicks since they’re both multi-lingual.

(via rainbowrowell)

January 20, 2014

(Source: mattsgifs, via femininepositivity)

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